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20130706
20130714
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, cbo shows us $642 billion deficit, down to 4% gdp for this year, that is weighed down from 10.1% four years ago and if you will, that takes a little bit of the impetus for coming up with an embargo on tax reform, reduces that even if all the projections indicate that those large deficits come ring back. so i see this tax reform issue as being tougher. the other thing i will comment on and take your questions is the affordable care act. this is a very big deal for the services i indicated, a very challenging endeavor we saw last week with the administration delayed for a year mandate that employers provide certain categories of insurance or face penalties. clearly a recognition of the lack of readiness out there in the work force. you have seen a lot of interesting things happen there. i can tell you from indianapolis, i was eating the same day that announcement came out before i heard about it at a national chain and i don't cook. so i eat out. there are several restaurants that know me well and the manager was -- good restaurant, part of a pretty big chain, telling me it came down fr
rates to the market without a cap to protect students. this proposal would pay down the deficit on the backs of students, trading national debt for student debt. trading national debt for student debt. it is unacceptable, the letter goes on, to use student loans as a vehicle for deficit reduction, especially when the federal government is projected to make $51 billion on student loans just this year. so that will be the vote tomorrow. and, madam president, i ask consent that this letter, along with the list of the organizations supporting the one-year extension, appear at this point in the record. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. harkin: so that's -- that's really the vote tomorrow. are we going to keep 3.4% or are we going to allow it to double? that's the essence of the vote tomorrow. now, there is a lot of different ideas floating around about what to do, how to do this, but in just about every single case, every one of those bills, if you project out over the next couple of three years, will raise interest rates higher than 6.8%. so again, that's why extending i
with the law. and would boost our economy and make our country safer, reducing the deficit by about a trillion dollars over the next two decades. i remind the speaker there is no shame in passing bills both parties can support. americans want their elected officials to work together to fix the nation's problems. that's what we did in the senate. i promise the formula will work in the house of representatives as well. the speaker should try that. sticking to the hastert rule is preventing the house from passing legislation to reform the ailing postal service. he refused to even take it up last congress. didn't even take it up. sticking to the hastert rule prevented the house from passing a measure that would give brick-and-mortar stores parity. we passed it on a bipartisan vote here, mr. president. i mean it's heartbreaking all over america, i see it in nevada to go by these strip malls and you see these places that if they had the advantage of not having to pay sales tax -- that's what happens on line -- they would be in business. they would go back into business if the online -- the sales tax
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3